Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Coláiste Ríoga na Máinleá in Éirinn

Novel training approach to management of ruptured aneurysms introduced to Ireland

18 June 2014

A new approach to the management of ruptured aneurysms from presentation in the emergency department through to keyhole surgery and aftercare is being implemented by a team at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) and Beaumont Hospital. The first team training day to enable this minimally invasive approach in a hospital setting in Ireland took place at Beaumont Hospital, led by Mr Peter Naughton and Mr Daragh Moneley, Consultant Vascular Surgeons, RCSI.

Previously, ruptured aortic aneurysms (a swelling of the artery) were treated by open surgery. In recent years, minimally invasive ‘keyhole' endovascular techniques have been developed which can avoid open surgery in certain cases. This incurs a number of changes in the management of the patients at the time of arrival in the emergency department.

The multidisciplinary team training which has taken place at RCSI and Beaumont Hospital involved doctors in the emergency department, interventional radiologists, vascular lab, ward and theatre nurses to enable implementation of this new minimally-invasive approach to the potentially life-threatening condition. The training involved virtual reality simulation on a symbionix simulator and bench models to practise open repair.

Mr Peter Naughton, Consultant General / Vascular Surgeon, Clinical Lecturer, RCSI said: ‘Multi-disciplinary team-training with clear treatment protocols for ruptured aneurysms may facilitate improved performance and treatment of patients presenting with this catastrophic condition. It is important that surgical trainees and theatre staff are appropriately trained to expediently and efficiently perform both open and endovascular repair of patients with ruptured aneurysms. Access to minimally invasive treatment in suitable candidates will contribute to improved patient care by avoiding increased recovery times and risks associated with open surgery.'

RCSI is a not-for-profit health sciences institute which focuses on education and research to drive positive change in all areas of human health worldwide. RCSI is headquartered in Dublin and is a recognised College of the National University of Ireland. In 2010, RCSI was granted independent degree awarding status by the State, which enables the College to award degrees alongside its traditional powers to award licentiates.