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42
In 1916, St Stephen's Green was a
reminder of the splendour of Georgian
Dublin. It was also an important
junction, with several major access
routes into the city centre converging
there. e `Green' was regarded as a vital
location and a strategic position, by the
leaders of the 1916 Rising, to impede
British army reinforcements arriving in
the city centre.
INSURGENTS TAKE CONTROL
Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, saw the
arrival of approximately 120 insurgents
under Commandant Michael Mallin
in St Stephen's Green, where they
proceeded to clear it of any bystanders
and lock the gates. At 1pm, Mr Alfred
Miller, Registrar of RCSI, phoned
James Duncan, the College Porter,
and instructed him to lock the doors.
Oblivious to the mayhem around
him, John Freeman Knott, a College
academic, arrived for his daily visit.
Duncan opened the front door slightly
to explain to Knott that the College
was closed. At that moment, Countess
Constance Markievicz was leading a
group towards RCSI in the hope of
taking it over. is building could be
of use to Mallin if the need for a retreat
from the Green arose. Markievicz
seized the opportunity and forced her
way past Duncan and into the College.
e insurgents locked Duncan and his
family into a small room in his quarters.
RCSI was now under the control of the
insurgents.
A SECURE, ISOLATED OUTPOST
During the Rising, Mallin and his
garrison were safe and secure in the
College, but they were isolated from
any news of what was happening at
the other major insurgent outposts
around the city. ey heard rumours
that the Rising had been a success
and their fellow insurgents had taken
control of the city. So, when news of an
unconditional surrender reached Mallin
and his garrison on Monday, April 30,
1916, it was met with utter disbelief and
devastation.
MEDICAL BURDEN
In April 1916, Dublin's hospitals were
already working to capacity with
wounded soldiers evacuated from the
battle elds of Europe. During Easter
Week, as civilian and military casualties
mounted, temporary hospitals had
to be established. e most seriously
wounded were transferred to the major
1916 COMMEMORA
TIONS
RCSI AND THE EASTER RISING
ne h ndred years on rom the
aster isin
rchivist eadhbh
r hy
oo s bac on the o e e s ni e ro e in these historica events and ex ores how
mni wor ed tire ess y to treat the in red which in some cases cost them their ives
RCSI AND THE
EASTER RISING
RCSI College Hall in April 1916 after
the insurgents surrendered. A fi rst aid
station, to treat the wounded, was set
up behind the projector screen.
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