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RCSI
MATTERS
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RCSI
MATTERS
Somalia and explained, to the local
medics, the microplanning process of
reaching every child and how they
would administer the vaccines.
"Once a cycle is completed, you have
le enough tools for the local doctors to
be able to complete the next vaccination
cycles themselves." is was successful
as the local doctors were able to use
mobile phones and GPS navigation
in such a way, that they were able to
manoeuvre around the militia to reach
every district.
A er her experience in Somalia,
Dr Brennan went on to become
the Medical Epidemiologist in the
Emergency Response and Recovery
Branch in CDC's Division of Global
Health Protection. She maintains that
being bilingual she is uent in French
and building up trust amongst her
CDC peers on a global level over the
years, has led to her continued success
in the international emergency response
arena.
Although she has recently taken on
a new position, Dr Brennan says that
she wants to continue training and
educating local people to continue the
programmes her teams have put in
place, independently. "People who are
from those environments can empathise
and share their experiences with their
local communities, so it is important
for future success, that they have the
education to continue these healthcare
regimes, which we have originally
implemented.
"I am meeting people, who I would
have trained in Afghanistan years ago,
working on programmes in countries
like DR Congo. To see them growing
up, helping to train and educate others,
is really inspiring."
NEW ROLE, NEW CHALLENGES
In her new role, Dr Brennan will
provide the synergising link between
the UN, the emergency section in
UNICEF in Geneva and the WHO,
ensuring that high-level emergencies
are dealt with in a better way.
e role entails providing technical
assistance to all UNICEF-led and co-
led humanitarian clusters and areas of
responsibility (AoRs), in supporting
e ective assessment, monitoring and
coordination in complex humanitarian
emergencies (CHEs); supporting the
development of best practices in the
areas of humanitarian assessment
and support the operationalisation of
primary and secondary assessment
data; and strengthening coordination
and data collection to address
challenges accessing `hard-to-reach'
populations. Dr Brennan credits her
RCSI background for her international
career decisions.
"As a Dubliner in a homogenous
Ireland, RCSI opened my eyes to
di erent cultures as well as opening
doors to pursue the international career
that I am in now. Coming back to RCSI
for my 30th reunion, I can see my peers
maintaining their clinical work but
also trying to implement their work
outside in countries like Haiti and Sri
Lanka. Most of my peers are trying to
assert their medical experience in these
countries in a capacity-building way. I
really feel that, because RCSI is such an
international medical school, there is
more of an inclination to reach out on a
global level."
have one rom
researchin ad t
di htheria in
ssia to wor in
on vaccination
ro rammes in
oma ia
CLASS OF 1985 REUNION
DR MUIREANN BRENNAN
A refugee family from Somalia outside their
UNHCR tent in Dollo Ethiopia in 2011. Dr
Brennan visited them to enquire about
malnourishment reports.
DR BRENNAN'S KEY EMERGENCY RESPONSE HIGHLIGHTS
2002
Afghanistan
Mass measles vaccination programme
1,748,829 children targeted
91% coverage achieved
2010
Pakistan
Flood emergency response
2,000 killed and 20 million affected
2007
Syria
1.2 million Iraqi
refugees
$15m spent on
primary and
tertiary care
2010
Haiti
Earthquake response
100 CDC scientists work
on cholera outbreak
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03/03/2016 11:56