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EDUCATION, TEACHING AND LEARNING - RCSI School of Medicine
framework to shape the concept of
medical professionalism for students
advanced significantly in the past 12
months, with the establishment of
essential fundamental principles, under
the leadership of the Vice Dean for
Professionalism, Professor Kieran Murphy.
A specific definition of the concept of
medical professionalism for students,
both its cognitive foundation and its
required skills, has been established
and key principles have been developed
to ensure the effective allocation of
professionalism training appropriate to
each year of the Medical School cycle.
The work being done in this area
underlines the commitment of the School
of Medicine to the advancement of the
concept of medical professionalism and
its recognition of the critical importance
of professionalism to all doctors.
Simulation solutions for training
The SimMan 3G simulators, key elements
in the School of Medicine's simulation
technology strategy, have demonstrated
their effectiveness as teaching tools,
energising trainers and trainees alike.
Working with leading edge technology
has been an immersive process for all
concerned and SimMan 3G's utility is
particularly evident in the way it allows
trainer and trainee to isolate particular
procedures for further practice.
In a complementary development,
under the direction of the Health
Professionals Education Centre (HPEC)
and Professor John O'Byrne, a cohort of
trained, simulated patients -- individuals
trained to replicate symptoms, traits and
behaviours of real patients for assessment
purposes -- has now been established.
The deployment of these simulated
patients will contribute significantly to
the definition of the evolving role of
simulation in education.
Nationwide clinical engagement
In parallel with the implementation of the
vertical integration strategy, the School
of Medicine continues to promote deeper
engagement with clinical colleagues in
multiple clinical sites across Ireland in
order to further strengthen its teaching
programme. A collaborative initiative
has been set up, in conjunction with
undergraduate Deans, to accelerate
the creation of leadership roles in
clinical teaching at each of the clinical
sites. Furthering closer engagement,
Professor Arnold Hill has established a
schedule of bi-monthly meetings with
the undergraduate Deans to discuss
relevant issues and ensure leadership
development is encouraged and
supported.
The undergraduate Deans are:
Professor Garry Courtney, St Luke's
Hospital, Kilkenny
Dr Clare Fallon, Midland Regional
Hospital, Mullingar
Professor Peter Gillen, Our Lady of
Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda
Dr James Hayes, Cavan General Hospital
Professor Riona Mulcahy, Waterford
Regional Hospital
Professor Seamus Sreenan, Connolly
Hospital, Dublin
Ongoing curriculum development
The RCSI School of Medicine is
committed to an ongoing process of
curriculum evaluation and development.
The range of evaluation measures this
year included five intensive Focus Group
sessions, which were organised with the
objective of gaining insights from across
the Faculty of Medicine and Health
Sciences to assess current perceptions
of the curriculum's effectiveness and to
highlight areas requiring attention. These
Focus Groups have proved particularly
useful and it is planned to hold more in
the future to support the next phase in
the evolution of the curriculum.
A specific definition
of the concept
of medical
professionalism for
students, both its
cognitive foundation
and its required skills,
has been established.
Medical student Sami Backley carries out an examination on the SimMan 3G adult patient simulator. The simulators have demonstrated their effectiveness as teaching
tools, energising trainers and trainees alike.