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RCSI Committed to Education Excellence
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Publications included systematic reviews focusing on the evaluation of lifestyle interventions
for secondary disease prevention in stroke and transient ischaemic attack and a review of
clinical prediction rules used to predict adverse outcomes in older patients discharged from
the Emergency Department. Peer-reviewed articles were also published in a diverse range
of areas including gait analysis, cervical myelopathy, physiotherapy for hip osteoarthritis,
rehabilitation of older people and spasticity in stroke.
A welcome development was the expansion of the RCSI's Mentoring Network to Final Year
physiotherapy students. This network, enabling students interact with alumni globally, is,
potentially, a valuable source of clinical elective, employment and research opportunities.
Dara Meldrum, Lecturer in Physiotherapy, was a member of the steering group which, in
collaboration with DCU under the 3U Partnership initiative, developed the new MEng in
Healthcare Technologies which will commence in the 2013-2014 academic year.
Our newly appointed Practice Education Coordinator Fiona Daly recently completed
her MSc in Leadership and Management Development. As part of her dissertation, she
collaborated with the Practice Educators in Beaumont Hospital to implement innovative
placement models, employing a constructivist approach, where students participated
in patient encounters and worked alongside their peers. This initiative facilitated the
achievement of best practice in practice education delivery at a time of healthcare reforms
and resultant staff reductions.
The provision of a quality practice education programme continues to present challenges in
the current climate. The Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists recommends that every
student gets exposure to primary care settings. However, the current trend nationally is that
only fi ve per cent of physiotherapy students are completing community-based placements.
The need for increasing placement capacity within busy placement sites demands
regular networking and political astuteness. Increasing placement capacity will provide
the opportunity for more educators to benefi t from the well documented advantages of
supervising students. The signifi cant number of stakeholders involved in clinical education
and their geographical location creates inherent diffi culties but results in a well-rounded,
broad experience for students and fruitful discussions at practice education workshops.
The need for students to experience ever-changing health care environments will continue
to be an ongoing challenge.
Professor Marie Guidon
Head of the School of Physiotherapy
This network, enabling students
interact with alumni globally, is,
potentially, a valuable source of
clinical elective, employment and
research opportunities.
Graduates of the MSc in Neurology and
Gerontology pictured at the November 2012
Conferring Ceremony with staff members
from the School of Physiotherapy (front row
from left) Ms Louise Keating, Professor Marie
Guidon and Dr Helen French.