background image
RCSI Committed to Education Excellence
31
work on the part of ISPTC. The new programme will facilitate the completion of structured
training to CCST level within a continuous eight year programme. The programme will, in
broad terms be made up of two years Core Surgical Training, four years of Intermediate
Specialty Training, and two years of Fellowship Specialty Training. The new pathway sees the
elimination of the so called `gap' years between basic and higher training, with lab based
research moving to become an option in the later years of training. Notwithstanding the
opportunity for fl ow-through training, progression to specialist training will be competitive
and will be based on rigorous assessment of performance and competence.
In preparation for the full rollout of the programme, our 2013 trainee intake was signifi cantly
reduced from previous years. This will better refl ect the likely number of higher training
places, while still retaining appropriate levels of competitive progression. An innovation
introduced this year was that of a `Surgical Bootcamp', an intensive one-week induction
programme for all new trainees, designed to introduce trainees to basic surgical skills, the
principles of surgery, and surgical technology, as well as personal health and wellbeing.
A comprehensive curriculum was developed and was delivered by both in-house and
external Faculty, as well as a number of outside speakers.
The introduction of our fi rst Mobile app for surgical trainees (MSurgery) has been a signifi cant
development to support training in an environment where trainees need quick access to
knowledge resources and revision. The application includes minor operations, videos, library,
e-books, skills lessons, and training timetables. It also features an anatomy quiz game.
Beyond the new training pathway, work continues on curriculum development and mapping.
The recruitment of a Learning Development Manager during the year has greatly enhanced
our in-house capability to better scrutinise our curriculum, as well as modalities of delivery.
In addition, much progress was made in augmenting our in-house training faculty to ensure
consistency in delivery and course development in training, as well as our in our Professional
Development programmes. We remain committed to growing our investment in simulation
technology, and have invested in excess of 800,000 in new equipment over the past two
years, in anticipation of our planned move to a new state of the art training laboratory in the
next few years.
We continue to be strongly involved with, and committed to, the Forum of Postgraduate
Training Bodies, and have worked with them on several important training, regulatory and
service initiatives. We have a strong partnership with the HSE's Medical Education & Training
offi ce in the enhancement of training and the supporting service level agreements. We
greatly appreciate their level of engagement and support.
Surgical Practice
The enhancement of our leadership role for surgical practice continues to be a major priority
for Surgical Affairs. Despite unprecedented challenges to our service model, RCSI is strongly
supportive of the reforms being led by the National Surgery programme.
Mr Eunan Friel
Managing Director of Surgical Affairs
The new pathway sees the
elimination of the so called `gap'
years between basic and higher
training, with lab based research
moving to become an option in
the later years of training.